Tiffany Girl Power at the New-York Historical Society

Editorial Staff Magazine

Ten years ago, a show at the New-York Historical Society revealed a remarkable discovery made by a team of decorative arts scholars: the story of Clara Driscoll (1861–1944), the turn-of-the-century artist who, with her team of “Tiffany Girls,” designed some of the studio’s most iconic leaded glass lamps.

Tiffany in Chicago

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Dragonfly lamp by Tiffany Studios, shade designed by Clara Driscoll (1861–1944), c. 1902–1906. Blown glass, patinated bronze. Richard H. Driehaus Museum, Chicago; photograph by John Faier. The distinguished Chicago philanthropist Richard H. Driehaus has pursued Louis Comfort Tiffany’s “quest of beauty” since the early 1980s, when he bought his first stained-glass window attributed to the master artist. Over the next …

Louis C. Tiffany’s landscapes of devotion

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | Today Louis Comfort Tiffany is widely recognized as America’s leading designer of the decades around 1900, but during his lifetime he was best known primarily as a designer of religious art, particularly memorial windows. They were installed by the thousands-mostly in Protestant churches and cemetery mausoleums-and formed the bulk of his business over four decades. …

Lalique up close at Heritage Auctions

Editorial Staff Art

Starting tomorrow, December 5, New Yorkers will have a chance to see up close over one hundred examples of art glass by René Lalique—one of the leading names in the decorative arts—when Heritage Auctions begins the preview for its inaugural 20th century design auction in Manhattan. For those that can’t make the sale in person, we’ve gathered a slideshow of …

This Week’s Top Lots: March 23 – 27

Editorial Staff

*  A week of 20th century design auctions kicked off on Tuesday at Wright in Chicago, with a steady sale that brought in over $1.5 million with 72.5% sold by lot. The top selling items were both by Paul Evans, a Faceted cabinet (model PE-354) that sold for $44,375 (estimate $20,000-30,000) and an Argente cabinet (model PE-38A) which brought $32,500 …

Red, white, and Tiffany blue

Editorial Staff Furniture & Decorative Arts, Magazine

The ambitious transformation of the White House by Jacqueline Kennedy (1929–1994), which began in 1961—from a hotel-like assemblage of department store reproductions to a living museum of fine American antiques—was so greatly admired that many people believed those interiors would be thenceforth immutable. But nothing at the White House is forever, as that first lady came to realize about her …