The opulent vision of Paolo Veronese

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | An exhibition of the sixteenth-century master  reveals an artist uniquely committed to art, wealth, and aristocracy. A visit to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, feels nothing like a visit to Venice, Italy. Both cities, it is true, are on, in, or beside a large body of water, but beyond …

South America’s epic past unfolds in a New York City town house

Editorial Staff Exhibitions, Living with Antiques

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 |  “Everything is timing,” says Richard Huber, recalling opportunities spotted and seized over a long career that took him and his wife, Roberta, around the world. On a gamble, they invested in vineyards in Chile, an icebreaker in Antarctica, even an emerald mine in Minas Gerais, Brazil. A twenty-five-thousand-acre cattle ranch in the Brazilian outback served …

The coming storm: American landscape painting and the Civil War

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | The role of the Civil War in redefining America is well known. What is less well understood is the profound way in which the conflict changed American Art. Between 1859, when war was imminent, and the war’s end in 1865 writers and artists created their works surrounded by, and sometimes suffocated by, the impact of …

Winslow Homer’s The Life Line: A Narrative of gender and modernity

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2012 | Bringing a suspenseful story of danger and heroic rescue to an audience that never seems to tire of courageous knights and fainting maidens, Winslow Homer’s The Life Line (Fig.1) has been popular since the day it was completed in 1884. Homer’s themes of human frailty, bravery, and romance in the context of the overwhelming power …

A Rainy Day: Frank W. Benson’s Maine Interiors

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, July/August 2012 | By the time Frank Weston Benson discovered Maine’s North Haven Island in 1900, his career was flourishing. He had been longing for a retreat where he could paint undisturbed for more than a decade. Following his return home to Massachusetts in 1885 from two years at the Académie Julian in Paris, Ben­son quickly gained notice. …

Last Chance Exhibits

Editorial Staff Calendar, Exhibitions

  Last Chance Exhibits It’s the last chance to see these exhibits! May 27, 2012 GREENWICH LOST AND PRESERVED May 27, 2012 Greenwich Bruce Museum Address: Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive Greenwich, CT 06830-7157 Phone: 203.869.0376 For more information go to http://www.ctvisit.com/events/summary?eventid=14714   DRESSING UP, STANDING OUT, FITTING IN: ADORNMENT & IDENTITY IN MAINE, 1750-1950 May 27, 2012 Maine Historical Society …

The New York Botanical Garden unveils Monet’s Garden

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

      This weekend the New York Botanical Garden unveils “Monet’s Garden,” a new exhibition combining the flowers and gardens Claude Monet cultivated at Giverny, France with several of the paintings that the plants inspired. Visitors are invited to stroll through the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory, a Victorian-era glass house which offers Monet’s dramatic flowerscapes.  The gardens will change with …

Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World’s Fairs, 1851-1939

Editorial Staff Art, Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, March/April 2012 | In 1851 Albert, prince consort of Queen Victoria, and the architect Henry Cole realized their grand vision of an international exhibition where the traditions, aspirations, and accomplishments of many nations were showcased.1 Hardware at the Great Exhibition by Joseph Nash (1809-1878), from Dickenson’s Comprehensive Pictures of the Great Exhibition of 1851 (London 1852). Color lithograph. Victoria and Albert Museum, …

Winter Antiques Show 2012

Editorial Staff Art, Calendar, Exhibitions

We asked exhibitors at the Winter Antiques Show to highlight one exceptional object in their booths and describe it as they might to an interested collector. Here are the things they chose, along with some of their comments. Barbara Israel Garden Antiques We are thrilled to be bringing a cache of extraordinary objects to the 2012 Winter Antiques Show, including …

Duncan Phyfe: A New York Story

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2011| Fig. 1. The Shepherd Boy (also known as Landscape with Shepherd) by Robert S. Duncanson (1821-1872), 1852. Signed and dated “R.S. Duncanson/1852” at low­er left. Oil on canvas, 32 ½ by 48 ¼ inch­es. Metropolitan Museum of Art, gift of Hanson K. Corning by exchange.   Fig. 3. The Rainbow by Duncan­son, 1859. Signed …