George IV and the arts of France

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

By Geoffrey de Bellaigue, Deputy surveyor of the Queen’s Works of Art Originally published by The Magazine ANTIQUES in May 1966. From the day that George IV, as Prince of Wales, first took up residence at Carlton House when he came of age in 1782, to his death in 1830, he collected French works of art on a scale previously …

Current & Coming, January-March

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

For sheer variety of form, color, period, and place of origin it is difficult to match the offerings at the annual New York Ceramics Fair, where thirty-three tightly packed booths represent virtually everything in the world of fired clay-from purely utilitarian objects to those meant solely for aesthetic contemplation. Most of the dealers are from the United States, though there …

Farther Afield, January-March

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

  Before she died in 1983 in her enormous hôtel particulier on the banks of the Seine, Mona Bismarck created a foundation for art and culture in her name, and gave it, in addition to an endowment, her historic mansion on the avenue de New York. It was Bismarck’s means of creating a legacy more enduring than merely that of …

Louis C. Tiffany’s landscapes of devotion

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | Today Louis Comfort Tiffany is widely recognized as America’s leading designer of the decades around 1900, but during his lifetime he was best known primarily as a designer of religious art, particularly memorial windows. They were installed by the thousands-mostly in Protestant churches and cemetery mausoleums-and formed the bulk of his business over four decades. …

The opulent vision of Paolo Veronese

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | An exhibition of the sixteenth-century master  reveals an artist uniquely committed to art, wealth, and aristocracy. A visit to the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida, feels nothing like a visit to Venice, Italy. Both cities, it is true, are on, in, or beside a large body of water, but beyond …

South America’s epic past unfolds in a New York City town house

Editorial Staff Exhibitions, Living with Antiques

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 |  “Everything is timing,” says Richard Huber, recalling opportunities spotted and seized over a long career that took him and his wife, Roberta, around the world. On a gamble, they invested in vineyards in Chile, an icebreaker in Antarctica, even an emerald mine in Minas Gerais, Brazil. A twenty-five-thousand-acre cattle ranch in the Brazilian outback served …

The coming storm: American landscape painting and the Civil War

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, November/December 2012 | The role of the Civil War in redefining America is well known. What is less well understood is the profound way in which the conflict changed American Art. Between 1859, when war was imminent, and the war’s end in 1865 writers and artists created their works surrounded by, and sometimes suffocated by, the impact of …

Winslow Homer’s The Life Line: A Narrative of gender and modernity

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, September/October 2012 | Bringing a suspenseful story of danger and heroic rescue to an audience that never seems to tire of courageous knights and fainting maidens, Winslow Homer’s The Life Line (Fig.1) has been popular since the day it was completed in 1884. Homer’s themes of human frailty, bravery, and romance in the context of the overwhelming power …

A Rainy Day: Frank W. Benson’s Maine Interiors

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

from The Magazine ANTIQUES, July/August 2012 | By the time Frank Weston Benson discovered Maine’s North Haven Island in 1900, his career was flourishing. He had been longing for a retreat where he could paint undisturbed for more than a decade. Following his return home to Massachusetts in 1885 from two years at the Académie Julian in Paris, Ben­son quickly gained notice. …