Tradition, Innovation, and Good Design: The Ceramics of David Gil

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

“‘Bennington’” as the Warner Collector’s Guide to North American Pottery and Porcelain notes, “refers not to a specific company but a town in Vermont that is well-known for the pottery made by a number of firms.” While the authors of the guide had nineteenth-century makers of Rockingham-glazed yellowware and parian in mind, that entry may now be updated to include …

Amish Quilts and Recent Acquisitions at the Textile Museum

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

When the International Quilt Study Center and Museum at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln was founded in 1997, an important aspect of its mission was to promote scholarship by exhibiting its vast collection at institutions throughout the world. Tomorrow a group of the center’s Amish quilts goes on view at the Textile Museum in Washington in the exhibition Constructed Color: Amish …

A taste of history from Historic Deerfield

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

For over twenty years Historic Deerfield has hosted an open hearth cooking program that gives visitors a taste of the food and diet of Americans living in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Held in the kitchen of its 1786 Tavern Hall, the open hearth cooking program at Historic Deerfield offers adults and children a range of experiences including weekly cooking …

Tulip Vases and Trivets: Contemporary ceramics by Sanam Emami

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Sanam Emami is a studio potter with a distinctive appreciation for the past. Her signature form is the tulip vase, the multi spouted, tin-glazed concoction that dates from the tulip craze that swept much of Western Europe in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. In Emami’s hands however, the vase becomes contemporary and personal. Her current exhibition, Organic Precisionism, …

Chintz Appliqué: From Imitation to Icon

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Visitors to the exhibition Chintz Appliqué: From Imitation to Icon are amazed by the size, elegance, vibrant color, and meticulous craftsmanship of these quilts.  On view through May 17 at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum, these twenty-one American quilts represent “one of the earliest and most influential international quilt styles,” according to curator Carolyn Ducey. One of the …

Japanese Craft in Philadelphia

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

Much has been written about the influence of Japanese design on American and European works of the nineteenth century, but turn the lens in the other direction, looking at the influence of Western art on Japan, and there have been far fewer inquiries. The Art of Japanese Craft: 1875 to the Present, presented at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through …

America in 3 by 5

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

February 2009 | Walker Evans believed in picture postcards. The great photographer began collecting them as a boy, years before he ever snapped his first picture. Throughout his life he celebrated them, wrote about them, experimented with the format, and continued to collect them. “On their tinted surfaces,” he wrote in a 1948 Fortune magazine article, “were some of the …

Palm Beach

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

“Follow the money.” What was good advice for Woodward and Bernstein is equally useful guidance for the antiques collector. When Henry Morrison Flagler established Palm Beach as a winter haven for Gilded Age society, important furnishings and art were sure to follow. And so they did. February sees the annual Palm Beach Jewelry, Art, and Antique Show, and those who …

William Holman Hunt in Toronto

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

The nineteenth-century English Pre-Raphaelite painter William Holman Hunt is the subject of an exhibition opening February 14 at the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto entitled Sin and Salvation: Holman Hunt and the Pre-Raphaelite Vision. More than sixty works will be on view including some of Hunt’s most iconic paintings-The Awakening of Conscience, The Light of the World, Isabella and …

Whither Londongrad?

Editorial Staff Exhibitions

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London celebrates Magnificence of the Tsars with a sumptuous display of men’s ceremonial attire from the Russian imperial court on loan from the Moscow Kremlin Museums’ collections. What could be more fitting in the British capital that is currently nicknamed Londongrad or Moscow-on-the Thames for its several hundred thousand Russian émigrés and its dominant …