Curious Objects & the stories behind them is now available for free each month on leading music and podcast apps (iTunes, SoundCloud).  Highlighted clips with commentary can also be found on our website.

Through interviews with leading figures in the world of fine and decorative arts, Curious Objects explores the hidden histories, the little-known facts, the intricacies, and the idiosyncracies that breathe life and energy into antiques and works of art.

Since 1922, The Magazine ANTIQUES has been the leader in fine and decorative arts scholarship. We’re certain that you’ll enjoy this twenty-first century means of telling stories about the things we collect and cherish, and we hope you will share your feedback with us as we continue development in 2018.
 

Meet our host

 
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Host Benjamin Miller, is director of research at the silver firm S. J. Shrubsole and one of the rising young stars of the New York art and antiques scene.

An urbane compère in the mold of Dick Cavett, Ben combines the friendly graciousness of his native Tennessee with the polish of his Yale education.
 

Our first episodes

 
 
Stuart Feld on an early American linen press
Listen now on iTunes or SoundCloud
Listen to the full episode and read the transcript on our site


“The form, the monumental scale, the extraordinary selection of woods—all of these come together in a piece that thus deserves the name of masterpiece”
 
 
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Katherine Purcell on a René Lalique art nouveau necklace
Listen now on iTunes or SoundCloud
Listen to the full episode and read the transcript on our site


"Handle as much as you possibly can. One can read as many books as are available, one can look at as many images on the Internet as you care to, but it's the handling of the piece in the end that will give you the most possible information."
 
 
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Michael Pashby on the secret history of the Windsor chair
Listen now on iTunes or SoundCloud
Listen to the full episode and read the transcript on our site


“It's a middle-class piece of furniture. It's not an important piece of furniture. . . . But it has a fascinating history.”
 
 
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